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Young Masters Art Prize Shortlisted Artist: Carole Freeman

Carole Freeman is a painter of people and narrative pictures. Her practice consists of on-going bodies of work that combine clinical study, empathy, humour, and ironic juxtaposition with subject matter culled from life experience, world events, daily news, history, and literature, as visual commentary and witness to contemporary concerns. Occasionally referencing Old and Modern Masters, Freeman has drawn upon the work of artists as varied as Polykleitos and Picasso, while both whimsically and seriously subverting artistic, cultural, political, and personal history. Stylistically positioned between classical representation and contemporary figuration, Freeman’s paintings manipulate time and space through fine detail and gestural brushwork, monochromatic and luminous colour, lightness of spirit and soulful depth.

Freeman studied BFA Honors at University of Manitoba, Canada and MA Painting at the Royal College of Art, London. Her recent Canadian solo exhibitions include: Something About Winnipeg, Gurevich Fine Art, Winnipeg, Selections 2012-2016, Walnut Contemporary and Portraits of Facebook, Edward Day Gallery, Toronto. An upcoming solo exhibition slated for Fall 2017 will be at Jim Kempner Fine Art, New York. Her work is held in collections including: Art Bank, Canada; Continental Oil Company, UK, Royal College of Art, UK, York University, Canada and Private Collections in Canada, UK, Italy, Australia, and USA including New York art critics Jerry Saltz and Roberta Smith.

Featured image: Carole Freeman, Demoiselles (study), 2017, Acrylic on paper,  56 x 76 cm  (22 x 30 in.)   

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Young Masters Maylis Grand Ceramics Prize Shortlisted Artist: Antonie Eikemans

Antonie Eikemans work conjures notions of alienation and recognition through the material of porcelain.  Maidenly, fragile, airy and serene, Eikeman’s contemporary daily activities are brought to life, covered with swarming transfer decorations and adornments of gold leaf.  Busts and figurines mobilise the uncanny: something immanently familiar lurks within these imaginary and mystical beings. 

Eikemans graduated from the Academy for Industrial Design, Eindhoven in 1976, before going on to graduate in Spatial Ceramic Design at the Royal Academy of Art and Design, s-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands, in 1984. Eikemans has since gone on to teach Spatial Design at a number of Dutch institutions. Recent exhibitions include: Woven Heritage: International Miniature Printmaking, Dubai, 2017; International Ceramics Competition Carouge, Switzerland, 2015; Biennalle de Manises, Spain, 2015; and Ceramics Bienalle 2015 Coda Museum, Apeldoorn The Netherlands.

Featured image: Antonie Eikemans, Me and my Fox, 2017, porcelain, transfers and gold, 24 x 19 x 13cm (9.4 x 7.5 x 5.2in.)

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Young Masters Maylis Grand Ceramics Prize Shortlisted Artist: Andrew Casto

Andrew Casto’s current body of work investigates dialogues concerning extant negative forces in our lives, and the degree to which they shape us physically, mentally, and emotionally.  The formal language present in this analysis is based on a material study of erosion and geologic processes, translated into ceramic and mixed media objects.  Within this inquiry, alternative and diverse construction methods are emphasized as tools of fresh, genuine expression in the creation of dynamic assemblages of great fragility.   

Casto is currently Assistant Professor of Art and head of the Ceramics area at The University of Iowa.  He was an Artist-in-Residence, and the 2011 MJD Fellow at The Archie Bray Foundation, Montana, and has exhibited work internationally in Spain, Croatia, Italy, Slovenia, Belgium, China, and Japan.  He was recently selected as a recipient of a 2015 Emerging Artist award by the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA). Recent solo exhibitions include Galleria Salvatore Lanteri, Milan, 2016, and Mindy Solomon Gallery, Miami, 2017.

Featured image: Andrew Casto, Assemblage 140, 2017, ceramic and lustre, 33 x 13 x 9cm (13 x 5.1 x 3.5in.), courtesy Mindy Solomon Gallery